MOROCCAN LAMB

by Neil Clifton

I have never been to Morocco, but my friends who have marvel at the place. I cooked this on  cold Sunday afternoon, the Yorkshires were the left overs of the traditional Sunday breakfast in our house, pancakes. I had been watching Rick Stein's trip through Turkey and Morocco, raided the cupboards and hey presto! The salad is BBC good food recipe, with some added feta.

INGREDIENTS

For the Lamb:
1 whole lamb shoulder, 

3 preserved lemons, 

4tbsp harissa paste

200ml red wine

200ml chicken stock

chopped parsley.

40 ml Balsamic Vinegar

2 onions, halved

2 large potatoes, halved.



Salad:
50g bulgur wheat

50g flat-leaf parsley, chopped

50g mint chopped

200g ripe tomatoes, deseeded and diced

3 spring onions, finely sliced

Juice 1 lemon

3 tbsp olive oil

30g Feat, crumbled



Yorkshire Puddings:
140g plain flour (this is about 200ml/7fl oz)

4 eggs (200ml/7fl oz)

200ml milk

Duck fat/ lard

METHOD

1. Lightly brown both sides of the lamb (about 2 mins per side)

2. Pierce the skin of the lamb with a sharp knife and cover with the harissa paste.

3. Lay the halved onions and potatoes at the bottom of a roasting pan and place the lamb on top.

4. Add all of the remaining ingredients to the pan and bring to a gentle simmer and prepare the Yorkshire pudding mix.

5. Cover and cook in the oven for 4 hours, until meat can be pulled away with 2 forks.

6. Meanwhile combine all of the salad ingredients.

7. About 40 minutes before the lamb is ready heat the Yorkshire pudding tins in the oven with your choice of fat. Once sizzling hot add the batter mix. Cook for 20/25 mins.

8. To serve, shred the lamb retaining the juices, cut the top from the Yorkshires and stuff with the meat. Sprinkle over the salad.

HINTS & TRICKS

The potatoes and onions used to support the lamb can be used and an extra side. However, I like to blitz them in a processor and make them a base for a thick vegetable soup for lunch the next day.

WINE SUGGESTION: A very light Rioja with not to much body it brings out the denseness of the lamb and the subtle heat of the Moroccan flavours.

MOROCCAN LAMB

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